Oregon and Southwest Washington Real Estate Market Update

 

The following analysis of the Oregon and Southwest Washington real estate market is provided by Windermere Real Estate Chief Economist Matthew Gardner. We hope that this information may assist you with making better-informed real estate decisions. For further information about the housing market in your area, please don’t hesitate to contact your Windermere agent.

 

ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

Oregon added 42,000 new jobs over the past 12 months, representing a very solid annual growth rate of 2.2%. In the second quarter Gardner Report, I stated that job growth in Oregon was starting to taper, but since then the state has made adjustments to figures from the last three years that now suggest job growth was stronger than originally reported.

The Southwest Washington market (Clark, Cowlitz, Skamania, and Klickitat Counties) added 8,590 new jobs over the past 12 months which represents an annual growth rate of 4.1%.

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 3.8% in August, well below the 4.2% rate of last year. In Southwest Washington, the unemployment rate was 4.6%, down from 5.2% last year.

 

HOME SALES ACTIVITY

  • Third quarter home sales dropped 6.6% when compared to the same period last year, with a total of 18,486 transactions occurring.
     
  • Sales rose the most in Cowlitz County, which saw a 22.9% increase compared to the third quarter of 2017. There was also a solid increase in Klamath County. Home sales fell the most in Tillamook, Klickitat, Crook, and Hood River Counties.
     
  • Year-over-year sales rose in three counties but dropped in the other 23 counties contained in this report.
     
  • The drop in sales is likely not a result of declining demand, rather it is a function of rising inventories in many markets (especially those close to large employment centers).

 

 

HOME PRICES

  • The average home price in the region rose 6.8% year-over-year to $390,636. However, we did see a modest 0.6% price decline when compared to the second quarter of this year.
     
  • Tillamook County led the market with the strongest annual price growth. Homes there sold for 52.8% more than a year ago, but this is likely because it’s a very small market that can be prone to significant swings.
     
  • Similar to last quarterall but four counties experienced price growth compared to a year ago, with 10 of them experiencing double-digit increases.
     
  • The takeaway from this section is that price growth is slowing as some markets reach an affordability wall.

 

 

DAYS ON MARKET

  • The average number of days it took to sell a home in the region dropped by one day compared to the third quarter of 2017 and was down by six days from the second quarter of 2018.
     
  • The average time it took to sell a home last quarter was 65 days.
     
  • Fourteen counties saw the length of time it took to sell a home drop or remain static compared to a year ago. Twelve counties saw market time rise.
     
  • Homes again sold the fastest in Washington (25days), Cowlitz (28 days), and Yamhill (29 days) Counties.

 

 

CONCLUSIONS

The speedometer reflects the state of the region’s real estate market using housing inventory, price gains, home sales, interest rates, and larger economic factors.

The region’s economy remains strong and this will continue to drive demand for housing. However, as I review the data, there appears to be a shift in the air, with rising inventory levels and slowing sales. I do not see this as being a cause for concern, but instead a shift toward a more balanced market. The rise in inventory indicates that there are clearly home sellers who believe the housing market in their area has peaked and now is the time to sell. As such, I have moved the needle further toward buyers, but it still remains a seller’s market.

 

 

 

Matthew Gardner is the Chief Economist for Windermere Real Estate, specializing in residential market analysis, commercial/industrial market analysis, financial analysis, and land use and regional economics. He is the former Principal of Gardner Economics and has more than 30 years of professional experience both in the U.S. and U.K.

Idaho Real Estate Market Update

 

The following analysis of select Idaho real estate markets is provided by Windermere Real Estate Chief Economist Matthew Gardner. We hope that this information may assist you with making better-informed real estate decisions. For further information about the housing market in your area, please don’t hesitate to contact your Windermere agent.

 

ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

Job growth in Idaho remains fairly strong. Over the past 12 months, the state has added 22,000 new jobs, representing a solid growth rate of 3.1%.

In August, the state unemployment rate was 2.8%, down from 3.1% a year ago. The state is, essentially, at full employment, and it appears my forecast predicting that Idaho would add just over 20,000 new jobs in 2018 will likely come true.

 

HOME SALES ACTIVITY

  • 6,592 homes were sold during the third quarter, representing a very modest drop of 0.3% from the third quarter of 2017.
     
  • In Northern Idahosales again rose the fastest in Bonner County, where they were up by a substantial 28.7% relative to the third quarter of 2017. There were more modest increases in the other two counties. In Southern Idaho, we saw substantial sales growth in the relatively small Payette County but lower sales in Canyon, Ada, and Blaine Counties.
     
  • Demand for housing remains strong, but pending sales saw a modest decline. Listing activity remains at relatively low levels and, given substantial growth in home prices, this may be limiting the ability for some to buy. I am hoping inventory levels will rise, but it is unlikely that this will happen until next spring.
     

 

HOME PRICES

  • The average home price in the region rose 15.7% year-over-year to $326,329.
     
  • Payette County led the market with the strongest annual price growth. Homes there sold for 28.3% more than a year ago, but this is a small market with very few sales, so it is subject to severe swings in average sale prices.
     
  • There were price increases in all but one county compared to the third quarter of 2017. The outlier was Valley County, which had a very modest drop.
     
  • As I have stated in prior reports, listing activity continues to drive home prices up at above-average rates. I do not see this changing substantively until the new year.
     

 

DAYS ON MARKET

  • It took an average of 93 days to sell a home in Northern Idaho and 72 days in the southern part of the state.
     
  • The average number of days it took to sell a home in the region dropped six days when compared to the third quarter of 2017 and was down by nine days from the second quarter of this year.
     
  • Homes in all but two surveyed counties took less time to sell than they did in the same quarter of 2017. The outliers were Valley and Kootenai, which saw the time it took to sell a house rise, but very modestly.
     
  • Homes again sold the fastest in Canyon and Ada Counties, where it took an average of 26 and 27 days, respectively.

 

 

CONCLUSIONS

The speedometer reflects the state of the region’s housing market using housing inventory, price gains, home sales, interest rates, and larger economic factors. 

Job growth continues to spur the housing market in Idaho and this is unlikely to change. The number of available homes for sale is still well below where I would like it to be, which is causing prices to continue to rise at above-average rates. That said, limited sales growth may be a function of housing affordability, which may be keeping some buyers on the fence.

I will be interested to see if this trend continues in the fourth quarter. Given these factors, I have moved the needle just a little more in favor of home sellers.

 

 

 

Matthew Gardner is the Chief Economist for Windermere Real Estate, specializing in residential market analysis, commercial/industrial market analysis, financial analysis, and land use and regional economics. He is the former Principal of Gardner Economics and has more than 30 years of professional experience both in the U.S. and U.K.

Designing the Perfect Home Office to Work From Home In Style

Working from home is an aspiration for many of us, but to do so effectively takes work. A disorganized space at home can be just as troublesome as a hectic office. The most disciplined telecommuters will tell you that you need a structured routine and organization to rise and grind and get into work mode.

Having a designated workspace is quite possibly the most important piece to the work-from-home pie. Even if you live in a small space, you need to find a balance between home and office. People who work from home often have a difficult time separating work hours from their non-work hours because it’s so easy to keep at it late into the night. But maintaining a balance and shutting down the computer is important for overall wellbeing. What are some other must-haves for a successful home office? Here are the top five:

 

  1. Natural Light – Study upon study tells us that natural light is needed to boost productivity and mood. Make sure to set your desk up as close to a window as you can. If being near a window isn’t an option, a natural light lamp is the next best thing. It helps balance your body clock and leaves you feeling rested and refreshed.
     
  2. To-Do List or Planner – Start each day off by making a to-do list outlining what you need to get done before the end of the workday. Make sure to set a realistic time frame in which all of that should be completed, so you can check each one off the list and feel immense accomplishment once you’ve completed them all.
     
  3. Storage – If you have a big enough space, put in a large bookshelf where you can organize everything (think storage boxes). It reduces clutter and looks stylish. Using your walls and cabinetry is the most efficient use of space.
     
  4. Calendar – Many people tend to rely on digital calendars these days because of their convenience. When all of your devices sync together and pop up with reminders, you never have to worry about missing an appointment. However, many people find that it helps to keep a paper calendar handy too so you can easily view your whole month at a glance.
     
  5. Space for Inspiration – It doesn’t matter what field you work in, having a source of inspiration in your workspace is essential. Whether it’s a photo of your family, your dream car, or that vacation you’ve been dying to take, having that inspiration right in front of you provides a constant reminder of why you do what you do.

Central Washington Real Estate Market Update

 

The following analysis of the Central Washington real estate market is provided by Windermere Real Estate Chief Economist Matthew Gardner. We hope that this information may assist you with making better-informed real estate decisions. For further information about the housing market in your area, please don’t hesitate to contact your Windermere agent.

 

ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

Washington State continues to be one of the fastest growing states in the nation and there is little to suggest that there will be any marked slowdown in the foreseeable future. Over the past year, the state has added 105,900 new jobs, representing an annual growth rate of 3.2%. This remains well above the national rate of 1.65%. Private sector employment gains continue to be robust, increasing at an annual rate of 3.7%. The strongest growth sectors were Construction (+7.4%), Information (+6.2%), and Professional & Business Services (+6.1%). The state’s unemployment rate was 4.5%, down from 4.8% a year ago.

The counties within Central Washington have added 2,861 new jobs over the past 12 months, representing a growth rate of 1.2%. The local unemployment rate for the area continued to fall, with a drop from 5.6% to 4.9%.

 

HOME SALES ACTIVITY

  • Last quarter, home sales throughout Central Washington dropped by 1.7% to 1,387 sales, but they were 6.8% higher than the second quarter of this year.

  • Sales rose most in Douglas County, which had an impressive 40.5% increase over the third quarter of 2017. Yakima was the only other county that saw sales rise. There was a significant drop in sales in Chelan County, which may be a function of high home prices in that area.

  • The number of pending home sales—an indicator of future closings — was up 4.1% compared to the second quarter, indicating that closings will likely rise in the final quarter of the year. 

  • have been suggesting that the shortage of homes for sale was an issue, but that appears to be reversing course. Total listings were up 12.1% compared to the second quarter of this year.
     

 

HOME PRICES

  • Year-over-year, the average home price in the region rose 15% to $327,412. Price growth remains well above the long-term average, but I expect that additional inventory will start to cool home price appreciation.

  • Okanogan County was the only market that saw average sale prices drop, but small markets can experience significant swings in price. I do not see this as a pervasive issue.

  • Prices rose in four of the five counties in this report compared to the third quarter of 2017. Chelan County stood out with a very substantial increase of 37.8%.

  • Home-price growth has been increasing at above-average rates due to supply constraints. However, I believe additional inventory will start to taper price increases.

 

 

DAYS ON MARKET

  • The average number of days it took to sell a home dropped eight days when compared to the third quarter of 2017.

  • The average time it took to sell a home in the region was 55 days, down 12 days when compared to the second quarter of 2018.

  • All the markets contained in this report, other than Douglas, saw days-on-market drop from the same quarter in 2017.

  • Homes again sold fastest in Kittitas County, where it took an average of just 34 days to sell a home. The greatest drop in days on market was in Okanogan County, where it took 43 fewer days than in the third quarter of last year.

 

 

CONCLUSIONS

 

This speedometer reflects the state of the region’s real estate market using housing inventory, price gains, home sales, interest rates, and larger economic factors.

For the third quarter of 2018, I have moved the needle a little toward buyers. Increases in inventory, together with modestly slowing home price growth, should take some of the “froth” off the market for the balance of the year.

 

 

 

Mr. Gardner is the Chief Economist for Windermere Real Estate, specializing in residential market analysis, commercial/industrial market analysis, financial analysis, and land use and regional economics. He is the former Principal of Gardner Economics, and has more than 30 years of professional experience both in the U.S. and U.K.

Utah Real Estate Market Update

The following analysis of select counties of the Utah real estate market is provided by Windermere Real Estate Chief Economist Matthew Gardner. We hope that this information may assist you with making better-informed real estate decisions. For further information about the housing market in your area, please don’t hesitate to contact your Windermere agent.

ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

According to the Labor Department, Utah has added 51,800 non-agricultural jobs over the past 12 months, representing a very solid growth rate of 3.5%, which makes Utah the fastest growing state in the country. For perspective, the U.S growth rate is running at 1.6%. Monthly employment gains in Utah have averaged 4,125 new jobs per month so far in 2018 and I believe we will end the calendar year having added more than 50,000 new jobs. In August, the state unemployment rate was 3.1%, down from 3.2% a year ago.

HOME SALES ACTIVITY

  • 9,589 homes sold during the third quarter of 2018, representing a drop of 5.7% from the same period in 2017.
  • Total sales activity rose in Wasatch County but dropped in the rest of the markets contained in this report.
  • Interestingly, and unlike almost all the Western states, listing activity continues to run at well below historical averages in Utah, which has been limiting the number of home sales. That said we saw a significant increase in the number of listings between the second and third quarters.
  • The supply of homes for sale appears to be rising, which could allow sales to increase. However, affordability issues may slow sales going forward even as we see more homes come onto market.

HOME PRICES

  • The average home price in the region continued to rise in the third quarter, with a year-over-year increase of 8.6% to $368,654.
  • In addition to Wasatch County, just one county saw double-digit price increases when compared to a year ago; last quarter there were four.
  • Appreciation was strongest in Wasatch County, where home prices rose by a substantial 17.9%. Although this sounds extreme, it is a very small market and subject to major swings.
  • The takeaway from this data is that home prices, which have been appreciating at above-average rates for several years, are likely to see a slowdown as we move through the winter and into 2019.

DAYS ON MARKET

  • The average number of days it took to sell a home in Utah dropped five days compared to the third quarter of 2017.
  • Homes sold fastest in Davis and Weber Counties and slowest in Summit County. All counties, other than Salt Lake (+1), saw the days on market drop when compared to the third quarter of 2017.
  • During the third quarter of this year, it took an average of 38 days to sell a home in the region.
  • Housing demand remains quite robust, but the expected increase in inventory will give buyers more choice and less urgency. This could lead to market time rising.

CONCLUSIONS

This speedometer reflects the state of the region’s real estate market using housing inventory, price gains, home sales, interest rates, and larger economic factors.

For the third quarter of 2018, I have nudged the needle a little more in favor of buyers; however, we are far from being in a balanced market. Well-positioned and well-priced homes will still attract a lot of attention, but rising inventory and housing affordability are likely to act as modest headwinds to total sales and home price growth.

Mr. Gardner is the Chief Economist for Windermere Real Estate, specializing in residential market analysis, commercial/industrial market analysis, financial analysis, and land use and regional economics. He is the former Principal of Gardner Economics and has more than 30 years of professional experience both in the U.S. and U.K.

Trick or Treat! Five Frighteningly Decorated Halloween Homes

Who doesn’t love a good scare every now and then? One of the best parts about fall is the chance to celebrate Halloween. While some folks are in it for the costumes and bags of candy, the eerie spirit of the season also sparks some imaginative home decorations. From the creatively crafted to the downright fright-inducing, there’s no shortage of spooktacular stylings out there. Choosing our favorites was difficult, but these homes really sent a tingle down our spine.

The Graveyard

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Photo Credit: OregonLive.com

Did something just move over there? Everything is a piece of the show at this remarkable home, which has featured a spooky pop-up cemetery every Halloween for the past 20 years. From its faux-church to the tombstones and skeletons, these homeowners have perfectly executed their very own haunted house.

 

Them Bones

Photo Credit: AngelaCoomey on Instagram

There’s nothing quite as creepy as a bit of uncertainty. If looked at a certain way, this extensive façade could almost pass for a heavy dosage of leafy décor. Instead, you can get just close enough to discover the boney truth. We’re just glad we didn’t come across this home at night!

 

The Monster House

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Photo Credit: IdealHome.Co.UK

A well-crafted monster-themed home is hard to beat. This particular property belongs to artist Christine McConnell, whose passion for things that go bump in the night led her to turn her home into an annual source of her neighbors’ nightmares. This year, she’s shifted from the many-eyed terror to a more fiery style. Scary enough for us, Christine!

 

Into the Clown’s Mouth

Photo Credit: @darthdoe on Instagram

We’re not sure if the rest of the house lives up to the terrifying standard its entrance sets, but we sure aren’t about to walk into that mouth and find out. The fact that it’s a clown makes it all the more unsettling. Walking down a row of similar houses only to notice that horrifying site from the corner of your eye is a terrifying thought.

Have a fun and frightastic Halloween!  

Eastern Washington Real Estate Market Update

 

The following analysis of the Eastern Washington real estate market is provided by Windermere Real Estate Chief Economist Matthew Gardner. We hope that this information may assist you with making better-informed real estate decisions. For further information about the housing market in your area, please don’t hesitate to contact your Windermere agent.

 

ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

Washington State continues to be one of the fastest growing states in the nation and there is little to suggest that there will be any marked slowdown in the foreseeable future. Over the past year, the state has added 105,900 new jobs, representing an annual growth rate of 3.2%. This remains well above the national rate of 1.65%. Private sector employment gains continue to be robust, increasing at an annual rate of 3.7%. The strongest growth sectors were Construction (+7.4%), Information (+6.2%), and Professional & Business Services (+6.1%). The state’s unemployment rate was 4.5%, down from 4.8% a year ago.

The Eastern Washington region added just 426 jobs over the past 12 months, representing an annual growth rate of 0.1%. The low growth rate is due to a marked decline in manufacturing which could be a function of ongoing trade and tariff issues. It will be interesting to see if this continues for the remainder of the year. Despite low employment growth, the unemployment rate for the counties covered by this report dropped to 4.7% from 5.1% a year ago.

 

HOME SALES ACTIVITY

  • Home sales throughout Eastern Washington continue to grow, but housing inventory is showing gains, as well. This increase in the number of homes for sale has caused sales to cool somewhat as buyers now have more choices and time to make them. Total sales rose by 1.6% over the same quarter in 2017 to 4,167 units.

  • Sales rose fastest in Whitman County, which increased 5.7% from a year ago. Walla Walla county saw a significant drop in sales but, because it is a relatively small market, it’s prone to significant swings.

  • Year-over-year, home sales rose in four counties, one county saw a drop, and Grant County saw exactly the same number of sales as a year ago.

  • The number of homes for sale was down 21.8% from the third quarter of 2017, but total listings were up by 13% when compared to the second quarter of this year.​
     

 

HOME PRICES

  • Year-over-year, the average home price in Eastern Washington rose 9.8% to $271,401. Price growth has been moderating and prices were essentially the same as in the second quarter.

  • Low inventory throughout the region has been a significant hurdle to would-be home buyers. I believe that we will see more homes come onto the market this fall and the trend will likely continue once we move into next spring.

  • All the counties in this report saw prices rise compared to the third quarter of 2017. Franklin County took over the number one spot with an annual price increase of 16.3%.

  • The takeaway here is that homeprice growth has started to cool a little and I expect that to continue as inventory levels rise.

 

 

DAYS ON MARKET

  • The average time it took to sell a home in Eastern Washington last quarter was 46 days.

  • The average amount of time it took to sell a home in Eastern Washington dropped by 21 days compared to the third quarter of 2017.

  • Every county other than Benton (+3 days) saw the time it took to sell a home either remain static or drop compared to the same quarter in 2017.

  • It took eight fewer days to sell a home in the third quarter than it did in the second quarter of this year.

 

 

CONCLUSIONS

This speedometer reflects the state of the regions real estate market using housing inventory, price gains, home sales, interest rates, and larger economic factors.

The number of homes for sale has picked up a little in recent months, but housing markets throughout Eastern Washington are still very tight. The overall trend remains in favor of home sellers; therefore, I am leaving the needle in the same place as last quarter.

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew Gardner is the Chief Economist for Windermere Real Estate, specializing in residential market analysis, commercial/industrial market analysis, financial analysis, and land use and regional economics. He is the former Principal of Gardner Economics and has more than 30 years of professional experience both in the U.S. and U.K.

Colorado Real Estate Market Update

 

 

The following analysis of the Metro Denver & Northern Colorado real estate market (which now includes Clear Creek, Gilpin, and Park Counties) is provided by Windermere Real Estate Chief Economist Matthew Gardner. We hope that this information may assist you with making better-informed real estate decisions. For further information about the housing market in your area, please don’t hesitate to contact your Windermere agent.

 

ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

The Colorado economy continues to perform quite well, having added 72,200 non-agricultural jobs over the past 12 months — a solid growth rate of 2.7%. Through the first eight months of 2018, the state has added an average of 6,700 new jobs per month. There has been a modest slowdown in employment gains, but I really don’t think this is a cause for concern and still hold to my forecast that Colorado will add a total of 82,000 new jobs by the end of 2018.

In August, the state unemployment rate was 2.9%. This matches the level seen a year ago. Unemployment rates in all the markets contained in this report rose between August 2017 and August 2018 but this is not actually a concern. Growth in the workforce is not only due to recent college graduates, but also discouraged workers who are starting to look for work again and this puts upward pressure on the unemployment rate. All of Colorado’s metropolitan areas are showing unemployment rates at around 4% or lower, suggesting that the regional economies are at, or close to, full employment.

 

HOME SALES ACTIVITY

  • In the third quarter of 2018, 16,550 homes sold — a drop of 6.2% compared to the third quarter of 2017.

  • Sales rose in just two of the 11 counties contained in this report. Gilpin County again led the way, with sales rising by an impressive 21.1% compared to third quarter of last year. There was also a significant increase in Clear Creek County. Sales fell the most in Arapahoe County.

  • Slowing sales in the quarter can, to a degree, be attributed to continued home price growth, but I believe it is more a function of the rapid rise in the number of homes for sale. The number of listings in third quarter rose by 5.4% over the same period in 2017, but was up by 31.2% compared to the second quarter of this year.
     

  • What the numbers are telling us is that inventory growth is giving buyers more choice and they are being far more selective — and patient — before making an offer on a home.

 

 

HOME PRICES

  • Even with the rapid rise in listings and slowing home sales, prices continue to trend higher. The average home price in the region rose 7.9% year-over-year to $460,982. However, the average price dropped 4% between second and third quarters.

  • The smallest price gains in the region were in Park County, where prices rose by a fairly modest 3.6%.

  • Appreciation was strongest in Clear Creek County, where prices rose 10%. All other counties in this report saw gains relative to the third quarter of 2017.
     

  • Affordability is becoming an issue in many Colorado markets and this, in concert with rising inventory levels, has started to dampen home price growth. Although I do not expect prices to drop, I do think price gains will moderate over the next few quarters.

 

 

DAYS ON MARKET

  • The average number of days it took to sell a home in Colorado remained at the same level as a year ago.

  • The amount of time it took to sell a home dropped in three counties: Gilpin, Clear Creek, and Larimer. The rest of the counties in this report saw days on market rise by only a couple of days or less.

  • In the third quarter of 2018, it took an average of 24 days to sell a home. It took less than a month to sell a home in all but one county.

  • Housing demand is still solid and, as long as homes are priced appropriately, they will continue to sell in less time than historic averages.

 

 

CONCLUSIONS

This speedometer reflects the state of the region’s real estate market using housing inventory, price gains, home sales, interest rates, and larger economic factors.

For the third quarter of 2018, I continue the trend that I started last quarter and have moved the needle a little more in favor of buyers. Listings are likely to continue their rising trend, but we should still see a seasonal drop off during the winter months. The market is clearly headed toward balance, which I am very pleased to see.

 

 

 

Matthew Gardner is the Chief Economist for Windermere Real Estate, specializing in residential market analysis, commercial/industrial market analysis, financial analysis, and land use and regional economics. He is the former Principal of Gardner Economics, and has more than 30 years of professional experience both in the U.S. and U.K. 

Helping Students Realize Their Dreams Through Scholarship Programs

 

The Windermere Foundation has raised $1,611,802 so far this year, bringing the total amount raised by the Foundation to over $37 million since 1989. Through the third quarter of 2018, $1,214,576 has been donated to local non-profits and charity organizations that provide services to low-income and homeless families.

 

Through donations from Windermere agents, staff, franchise owners, and the community, the Windermere Foundation has been able to donate to local scholarship programs that help students in need realize their dreams of furthering their education. The following are examples of two programs that have benefitted from Windermere Foundation donations this year.

 

Seattle Central College Foundation Scholarship Program

Each Windermere office raises its own funds and has a Windermere Foundation account that it can use to make donations to organizations in their local communities. This fall, the Windermere Seattle-Capitol Hill office generously donated to the Seattle Central College Foundation’s scholarship program, which is helping nearly 500 students attend the college this year, relieved of financial stress, and encouraging them to stay committed to their education.

 

Tammara S., the recipient of the Windermere Real Estate/Capitol Hill Scholarship, said, “I am honored to be the recipient of this scholarship… Attending school with an already tight budget was a hard decision to make. This scholarship will ease the stress of extra debt and the fear of having to choose anything over my education. Thank you, I appreciate your confidence in me and willingness to contribute to my future education.”

 

 

University of Washington Certificate Scholarship Program

The Windermere Foundation general fund also made a donation to support the University of Washington Certificate Scholarship program. With the help of UW Certificate Scholarships and the Windermere Foundation, 12 local adults living on low incomes were able to start classes at the University of Washington this fall. These are just a few of the recipients:

 

Loree, who is studying Fundraising Management:  A stay-at-home mom and active school volunteer/PTA fundraiser. Sadly, Loree recently lost her husband to cancer and has become her family’s primary provider. The certificate program will help her re-enter the workforce. “The scholarship will provide me the freedom to walk the path of discovery as I redefine who I am in this second phase of my life.”

 

Matthew, who is studying Wetland Science and Management:  A single dad of a 6-year-old, Matthew juggles childcare with full-time work supervising Washington Conservation Corps crews in the King Conservation District. Struggling to pay rent in Seattle, his aim is to move into a better paid job, with a schedule that better lines up with his daughter’s “… and a chance to improve the stability of our natural systems in the face of overwhelming pressures like climate change.”

 

Syed, who is studying Data Analytics:  Syed moved to the U.S. from Pakistan two years ago with a master’s degree and work experience in statistics. He is having great difficulty finding a job in his field because he has no local work experience or contacts. He is currently working at Walmart as a cashier to support his wife and 1-year-old son. “Completing this program will benefit me tremendously and help me to begin my profession, as a data analyst, in the U.S.”

 

Tobi, who is studying Project Management:  Tobi works as a corporate relations coordinator at one of the largest food banks in King County, based in South Seattle. She wants to expand her skillset and go on to lead social impact and corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs that ensure the advancement of underrepresented communities. “The skills I learn in this program will equip me to bring more to the table in this work.”

 

 

The Windermere Foundation is proud to support wonderful programs such as these that provide continuing education scholarships to those in need. Generous donations to the Windermere Foundation over the years have allowed the Foundation and our Windermere offices to continue to support local non-profits. If you’d like to help support programs in your community, please click on the Donate button.

 

To learn more about the Windermere Foundation, visit WindermereFoundation.com.