What to Consider When Buying an Equestrian Property

Buying a horse property is not your typical home purchase, especially for first time buyers. If you’ve never shopped for a horse property before, there is much to learn on the road to finding the best property for your needs. Working with an experienced Equestrian Advisor will also help ensure your home search and purchase go as smoothly as possible.

Horse Property Acreage

Just because a property has plentiful acreage doesn’t mean it will be suitable for horse care. The land must be flat-to-gently-sloped for grazing and provide adequate access to your horses’ basic needs. You want to look for properties with usable land – meaning there are not acres of unusable gullies, steep edges, or too many bodies of water that could make it difficult for your animals to navigate the property. Pay attention to local regulations about how much acreage is required per horse.

Zoning Instructions

If the property currently has horses or has in the past, do not assume it is an approved horse property. Part of your Equestrian Advisor’s job will be to ensure the property is in line with the local city, county, and/or HOA regulations for agriculture and livestock. Neglecting to verify the property could mean a significant financial setback if your horse property were the source of future legal issues and penalties.

Stable Inspections

When conducting the primary home inspection, be sure to have the barn and stables inspected as well. This could lead to higher upfront costs but skipping it could cause a huge headache later. Having a professional evaluate the barn and stables can reveal structural issues, electrical issues, or other potential problems that you would want to know about before you sign any paperwork.

Amenities

Housing horses and livestock on your property can be done with much more ease with a few convenient amenities. When touring prospective properties, look for the following:

  • Frost-proof spigots in the pasture, arena, and turnouts
  • Heated waterers in the stalls
  • Sufficient hay storage area
  • Tack room with a fridge for medication and supplements
  • Wash bay
  • Arena or training round pen

Your Routine

Transitioning to an equestrian lifestyle is a big adjustment, especially if this is your first time. Make sure you are taking your daily routine into consideration when looking at properties. How close are you to the barn? Where is the main water source? Careful planning every step of the way will make adapting to your new property much smoother and easier.

To connect with an experienced Equestrian Advisor today, click the link below: 

Equestrian Advisor

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